Mood up when the temp is down

posted Dec 14, 2013, 10:36 AM by Tom Harries   [ updated Dec 14, 2013, 10:45 AM ]

Dear Members and Friends of the Church of the Holy Communion:

How has your mood been affected this winter? Have the below zero temperatures and icy roads increased your anxiety and feelings of exasperation? Do you rely on sunny days and blue skies to keep you feeling in good humor?

Some exciting research linking food and mood suggests that it is possible to “eat your way to a better mood.” The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry published 2012 research findings indicating that certain foods seem to be especially helpful in promoting feelings of wellbeing and calm, while others help prevent deficiencies that lead to symptoms of depression, insomnia, or mood instability.

It’s possible to include healthy foods in your diet to help you gain and maintain a healthy mood. Low-calorie, nutrient-rich foods such as vegetables and fruits rich in anti-oxidants, wholegrain cereals and breads, beans, low–fat dairy products, lean meats and poultry, eggs, nuts and fish promote good brain health. Five specific super-foods that boost your mood are:

Bananas: loaded with Magnesium, boosts resistance to stress and decreases anxiety; Vitamin B6, promotes mental alertness; and Tryptophan, an amino acid, promotes the brain’s production of Serotonin, thus producing feelings of calm and wellbeing.

Mussels: rich in DHA, an essential fatty acid associated with better mood and lower risk of depression, lessens negative thinking, and impulsivity;

Vitamin B12, critical for healthy mood, focus, and memory; andSelenium and Vitamin B2 to promote mood stability.

 Brown Rice: a complex carbohydrate that increases Seratonin and provides Vitamin B1 (thiamine), supports a better mood.

Spinach: rich source of Folate, reduces agitation, promotes sleep, and supports a healthy nervous system. It is also rich in Magnesium that reduces anxiety.

Sunflower seeds: have high levels of Vitamin B1, Tryptophan, and Selenium to  stabilize your mood.

Reduce your consumption of foods that affect the brain and brain function such as: Coffee, Alcohol, highly processed foods or foods with high levels of chemicals or produced with hormones, high levels of sugar, and unhealthy fats. Try consuming more healthful foods and enjoy a happier disposition.

With love and care,    Judy Gardner, Parish Nurse 

    (March 2013) Mind, Mood & Memory, Massachusetts General Hospital 9,3.

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